Tag Archives: media psychology

Longhand note taking is best!

Longhand note taking is best!

So, it turns out that using a laptop or tablet is NOT such a good substitute for old-fashioned longhand note-taking because you no longer “process” the content!


Crazy ads for Burger King

Crazy ads for Burger King

Here are two :15s and a :30 from Burger King down under. They’re not the sort of thing you’ll see in the USA, and one wonders about the cultural differences between the Anzus chaps and ourselves. What say you?


What’s the message here?

What’s the message here?

This Procter & Gamble commercial purports to celebrate moms, showing how they nurture us from infancy to achieve greatness. But it seems to me that these three vignettes are more about the kids being coerced (however gently) into the pursuit of parental aspirations, rather than being allowed to discover their own. Have a look at the spot. Am I off base here? What do you think?


Cell phone ambushing

Cell phone ambushing

This article in Time includes a video that demonstrates how one man has decided to combat what he considers to be rude cell phone usage in public spaces. What do you think?


Yes, this IS a real commercial!

Yes, this IS a real commercial!

This is a very long form commercial at 3:05. The “performance” itself is unique and incredibly impressive in terms of what it must have taken to stage this event. The sponsoring company is not revealed until the end. I doubt this could air in the U.S., given our high rates for commercial air time. But as a YouTube video, it could score a lot of hits. We shall see. Any thoughts?


Christopher Walken’s silent side

Christopher Walken’s silent side

This link will take you to a series of spots for a clothing company in which Walken portrays a kind of magical-mystical tailor-designer. There are cgi effects to account for his super powers. A most remarkable features of these commercials is that Walken speaks not one word of dialog! The psychological impact of not using what is arguably one of the most distinctive voices in the TV-film acting world creates a special kind of weirdness that true Walken fans (like myself) can only marvel at.


Looks count more than sound for musical performance preferences

An email newsletter I subscribe to about the music business notes, “The way a musician looks on stage is more important to listeners than the music being played, according to a study just released.  That is, even though most music fans swear that they are evaluating the music based on the music itself, and little else.” The news cites a study from Dr. Chia-Jung Tsay, a professor at the University College, London, that is part of the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The piece can be downloaded free from the Academy website at this URL: http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/08/16/1221454110.full.pdf+html?sid=e6485f76-186a-42d1-9c95-af1c3e2f32f0


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